Architects and Contractors: Focus on VALUE when doing Sales!


archisnapper focus on value in sales

Over the last couple of months I’ve spoken with quite some contractors and architects related to a renovation of our house.

I know that AEC people are often very busy, and most of them have sufficient or even too many projects going on. It struck me how some of the people I spoke with didn’t do anything meaningful to convince me of their services.

They basically said nothing more but “OK, thanks for the info, I’ll make you a quote”.

They’re not helping me – as a potential customer – understand why they are the expert that I need and what the value is they can generate for me.

There was one though, who made the effort, and although he is rather expensive, there’s no doubt I’m going to work with his firm.

Why? Because he explained the VALUE of his work to me.

“Your roof is oriented to the south. I did some calculations, and as you can see, the ROI of placing a solar water heater is high. So although it would require an upfront investment, I think it’s worth it, and in the long term, you will definitely benefit. Shall I make you a quote?”.

YES! Of course, I want you to make me a quote. You’re basically showing me here on a piece of paper how much profit I will make by having you install that solar water heater. How could I say no to that?

As an architect, engineer, or contractor, you have a special and unique expertise.

By simply explaining the value of your expertise to your client, you will not only win more deals, but you will win them even if you charge a higher price.

If you focus on the value, the price becomes less and less important. If you don’t focus on value, the only thing you can talk about is price.

Teach people how much they will benefit, how much your service will help them achieve their goals and solve their problems. The more you focus on these values, the less important the price becomes.

Some examples of what value could mean in the construction industry.

Explain to them how:

  • selecting the right materials will significantly decrease the maintenance cost in the long run,
  • choosing the right heating system will reduce energy costs,
  • a certain design decision (e.g. incorporating an extra room in the attic or additional parking,) will increase the value of the house in the long run.

If you can explain to clients what value you can deliver, then they will come to trust you and they will want to work with you, even if you charge more than your competitors.

Read next: Smart pricing techniques for architects.

Take care, Jerry